Yes, Congress is broken. Earmarks will make it worse

first_imgIn 1987, President Ronald Reagan vetoed a highway bill because it contained 152 earmarks.By 2005, President George W. Bush signed a transportation bill that included 6,371.Earmark money is not equally divided among all members and senators. Nor is it allocated based on the needs of a particular state or congressional district.Earmark spending is controlled by power.More money is spent to assuage members on the “right” committee, with greater seniority or whose votes leadership needs on an unrelated issue.That’s great for voters living in a state or district represented by a powerful member of the majority party, but it’s inherently unfair.Further, earmarks replace the open, democratic process that should be used to allocate federal spending with backroom deals and graft. This has become a popular position for both Democrats and Republicans in Washington. Even President Donald Trump has suggested ending the ban.But eliminating this reform would be a costly and counterproductive mistake.“Congressionally directed spending” — the preferred euphemism of earmark supporters — has allowed politicians to insert individual spending provisions into larger bills, often without debate or an amendment vote and usually benefiting one congressional district or state.Supporters argue the long-standing practice allowed democratically elected members of Congress — rather than unaccountable bureaucrats — to set spending priorities in their districts and states.They also believe earmarks could help stifle chaos on Capitol Hill by giving congressional leaders carrots to reward team players and sticks to penalize the recalcitrant.While it is true that earmarks in some form or fashion date back more than two centuries, their use and abuse exploded after Republicans took control of the House in 1994.This accelerated after the turn of the century as then-Speaker Dennis Hastert and then-Majority Leader Tom DeLay kept slim GOP House majorities in line by ladling out buckets of pork-barrel spending. Earmarks figured prominently in the long litany of scandals leading up to Republicans losing their House majority in 2006.Boehner, then the House Republican leader, responded by telling members that an earmark ban was the first step they needed to repair the broken bonds of trust between Congress and the American people.Plus, earmarks today simply would not work the way they did in the past.The system relied on members and senators being able to brag about securing projects at home without facing scrutiny from the national media.The climate and media landscape have only become more transparent, aggressive and immediate since then.Can you imagine a member or senator, facing a tough decision on repealing and replacing Obamacare or overhauling the tax code, flipping his or her vote in exchange for a new post office or highway rest stop or any kind of new federal spending back home?They would be exposed instantly and pilloried mercilessly. Categories: Editorial, OpinionAs lawmakers on Capitol Hill continue to negotiate a tough spending bill this week, many commenters are lamenting the earmark ban put in place by then-House Speaker John A. Boehner in 2010.center_img Explaining his opposition to earmarks to his local editorial board, then-Arizona Rep. John Shadegg once pointed across the street to the Arizona Department of Transportation.Those experts working on transportation issues every day and assessing the needs of the whole state, he said, should decide where a new overpass or highway exit belonged — not a leadership or committee aide haggling with a congressman or senator in a Washington, D.C., cloakroom.Worse, earmarks entice members and senators to vote for things they wouldn’t otherwise support.If you want “your” money for “your” projects, you have to vote for the overall bill.That’s why, even though earmarks constituted a small portion of federal appropriations, then-Oklahoma Sen. Tom Coburn used to call them a “gateway drug” to higher government spending.If you balked at a pricy spending bill or disagreed with leadership on policy, your provisions wound up on the legislative cutting-room floor.Finally, the practice of earmarking inevitably invites corruption. Democratic senators who secured state-specific carve-outs in 2009 during the debate over the Affordable Care Act — changes they assumed voters back home would appreciate — know this well.They were startled to find their cherished provisions rechristened in national headlines as “The Cornhusker Kickback” or “The Second Louisiana Purchase.”There is no question that Congress is struggling to operate successfully in the face of changing technology and a changing society. Incentives have changed, and the institution has not yet changed with them.But ending the earmark ban would not simply turn back the clock to a more orderly era, any more than protectionist trade policies would bring back the “good old days” of the 1950s American economy.We need new thinking and new approaches.Michael Steel served as press secretary for former House speaker John A. Boehner from 2008 to 2015.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Tuesday, Jan. 28

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionClean Lady Liberty and bring her homeReturning Lady Liberty to her former home in Gateway Park will not detract from the new sculptures there. Her old spot is still vacant, waiting for her to return to her place of honor.It is a disgrace to Schenectady for an iconic national symbol to be wedged into a tiny, dangerous corner. Furthermore, was she as dirty as she is now when Mayor Gary McCarthy had her put there?Give her a good cleaning and bring her home.Joyce M. CockerhamSchenectady Trump impeachment articles underplayedWe are in the middle of the impeachment of the president of the United States of America.By any account, it is a proceeding with implications not only for every New Yorker, but every American, the very existence of our country and consequences for the entire world. It is an event that has only occurred three times before in the history of our country.Yet, on Jan. 23, this momentous proceeding was relegated to a story in the lower right-hand corner of your front page. More important apparently, were stories about a school budget gap and state prosecutors struggling under a new law.Not to diminish either story, but they pale in comparison to the crisis our country is facing.On Jan. 24, the impeachment coverage not only did not make the headline but was buried in a 4×5 small article on page 4. What in the world are you thinking?The only thing I can surmise is that you hope that few people read about this historic event that will change the course of history. Do better.Linda McDermottClifton ParkGive judges power to assess risk on bailRegarding the new bail law, how many Capital Region cases have there been that have raised the sky-is-falling reaction of sheriffs and Republican legislators?A couple? Five, six? It doesn’t seem more than that.On the other hand, how many people are free to continue working, supporting families or otherwise going about their lives as they await court cases?I’m not sure what the number is, but it is enough that a local bail bondsman has said he’s losing 80-90% of his business getting people out of jail who can’t afford the bail.There is no need to repeal the law as Sen. Jim Tedisco has called for. It just needs to be changed to allow judges to decide in a case where there is a clear risk or the need for a cooling-off period, as Saratoga County Sheriff Michael Zurlo suggested.Jim MurphyScotiaEnjoyed reading the historic informationI miss the 125 Years of news. I looked forward each day to reading the tidbits of news from The Daily Gazette’s history. Thank you for providing an interesting glimpse into our local past.Suzanne KingScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Make a game plan for voting. Do it now.EDITORIAL: Take a role in police reformsFoss: Schenectady Clergy Against Hate brings people togetherEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationHIGH NOTES: PPEs, fighting hunger, backpacks and supplies for kidslast_img read more

Suffolk

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Spanish retailers bring further fashion focus to Regent Street

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Cheap and cheerful

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On the right track?

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Offices: Central spark

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Limited partnership stakes snapped up in £40m deals

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Elementary Watson

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Picking up the gauntlet thrown down by Property Week

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