Category «jgllphhdyvvc»

California authorities find nearly 15 tons of illegally-grown marijuana

first_imgNastasic/iStock(LOS ANGELES) — Authorities in Southern California have conducted a massive drug bust that includes 14.9 tons of illegally-grown marijuana in one area. In addition to the drugs, investigators also found 37 guns, multiple dogs and a honey oil lab at the properties in the Perris area, about 70 miles east of Los Angeles, according to the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department. The dogs are now safe, authorities said.Authorities were serving 48 search warrants in the area and have made 27 arrests.Photos tweeted by the sheriff’s department show plants being pulled from the ground and being placed into vans for transport. Current preliminary stats: 32 search warrants served at illegal grows, 1 BHO lab, 21 guns, 5.9 tons #marijuana, 10 arrest. We have no additional releasable information at this time. #weedbegone #marijuana #420nomore #illegalgrows #sheriff #riversidecounty #riversidesheriff https://t.co/YolYIkH5uP pic.twitter.com/E2qZBx4kP7— Riverside County Sheriff’s Dept (@RSO) July 18, 2019Other photos show deputies comforting the dogs they found on the properties.So what did we find at these illegal marijuana grows? – Dogs and guns. The dogs are ok #RCDAS and the guns were taken as evidence. currents stats: 48 search warrants, 27 arrest, 37 guns, and 14.9 tons of illegal marijuana. #riversidecounty #sheriff #perrisarea #illegalgrows pic.twitter.com/XaHj3qryF7— Riverside County Sheriff’s Dept (@RSO) July 18, 2019Aerial footage taken by ABC Los Angeles station KABC-TV shows workers as they confiscate massive amounts of cannabis plants from the property.Additional information was not released.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Minnesota pilot rescued after small plane becomes entangled upside down in power line

first_imgiStock(LOUISVILLE TOWNSHIP, Minn.) — Firefighters in Minnesota rescued a pilot after the small plane he was flying became entangled in a high-voltage power line upside down.Emergency dispatchers received a 911 call reporting the single engine plane had crashed on 150th street in Louisville Township, just before 4 p.m. Saturday, according to a release by the Scott County Sheriff’s Office.The pilot, 65-year-old Thomas Koskovich of Shakopee, Minnesota, was not injured in the crash, authorities said.He was rescued after the power was cut off to the lines, St. Paul ABC affiliate KSTP-TV reported.“This incident could have been much worse,” Sheriff Luke Hennen said in a statement. “We are grateful the pilot was able to walk away without any injuries.”Photos released by the sheriff’s office show the plane dangling from the power line as emergency crews work to get Koskovich out of the aircraft.It is unclear what caused the plane to crash. The Federal Aviation Administration is conducting an investigation.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

HR takes centre stage in dubious docu-soap

first_imgCar rental firm Holiday Autos’ people management has been under thespotlight following the antics of HR manager Susan Wright – one of the ‘stars’of the BBC TV documentary The Secret Life of the Office. But while many viewers of the fly-on-the-wall show will assume the callcentre’s HR team spend their time sending out shirty e-mails warning staff overfrequent toilet use or banning eating and drinking at desks, that imagecouldn’t be further from the truth. Joanne Jobson, Holiday Autos’ new HR director, said her team had beenworking hard to improve recruitment and retention of staff. They have updatedthe recruitment process, increased induction training from one to three weeks,and introduced mentors for new staff. Since filming 18 months ago, the company has recruited more than 100 newstaff and reduced employee turnover by 15 per cent to 25 per cent. It nowemploys more than 400. The company has also introduced more flexible working arrangements andimproved communication with the senior management teams. Jobson believes the HR team – now 10-strong, up from two during filming –suffered as a result of some cynical editing by the programme’s makers. Shesaid it was a turbulent time for the business, which included a company-wideoffice move and the launch of a recruitment drive. “The HR department was definitely treated harshly – all call centreshave these performance conditions in place as we need to know what staff aredoing,” she said. “They were not enforced or talked about as much asthe TV show makes out.” The adverse publicity has improved morale among the current workforce, saidJobson. “It has also brought staff together behind the company – as it didnot fairly represent the business.” By Paul Nelson Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article HR takes centre stage in dubious docu-soapOn 6 Aug 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

SUU Men’s Basketball 2019-20 Schedule Revealed Wednesday

first_imgAugust 28, 2019 /Sports News – Local SUU Men’s Basketball 2019-20 Schedule Revealed Wednesday Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCEDAR CITY, Utah-Wednesday, Southern Utah University men’s basketball revealed its 2019-20 schedule, which features trips to Power 5 conference foes Nebraska and UCLA.Head coach Todd Simon expressed his excitement in the Thunderbirds facing this challenging slate and also looks forward to playing regional foes Long Beach State, Loyola Marymount and UC Santa Barbara.SUU also visits BYU to face the Cougars at the Marriott Center November 13 and hosts in-state foe Utah Valley December 7. They will commenc the Big Sky Conference season at Portland, Ore. against the Portland State Vikings December 30.The Thunderbirds’ Senior Day game will occur February 29 at the America First Event Center against the Idaho Vandals.The 2020 Big Sky Conference tournament will run from March 10-14 at Boise, Idaho. Tags: Idaho Vandals/Long Beach State/Loyola Marymount/Nebraska/Portland State Vikings/SUU Men’s Basketball/Todd Simon/UC Santa Barbara/UCLA/Utah Valley Brad Jameslast_img read more

New measures to clamp down on rogue landlords

first_imgFresh proposals designed to crackdown on rogue landlords who force susceptible tenants to reside in substandard, overcrowded properties, have been announced by the Housing Minister Brandon Lewis.The suggestions made by the DCLG and the Housing Minister intend to make it easier for local authorities to raise standards in houses used as shared homes by extending mandatory licensing to smaller and medium sized properties, in order to bring an end to callous landlords who exploit their tenants and charge them extortionate rents to live in cramped conditions.The existing rules apply to homes of three storeys, but it has now been suggested that the rules also apply to more shared homes, including those that are one-two storeys, as well as poorly converted blocks of flats and flats above and below shops, while Mr Lewis also wants to set a minimum size of rooms in line with existing overcrowding standards.Additionally, the Government is reviewing the information requirements when applying for a licence in order to simplify and speed up the process.The discussion paper is available to view at https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/extending-mandatory-licensing-of-houses-in-multiple-occupation-and-related-reforms.Responses are due on 18th December 2015.The Housing Minister (left), who was a keynote speaker at The Negotiator Conference & Expo, last week, commented, “It is simply unacceptable that people are living in cramped, unsafe accommodation provided by landlords who are more interested in a quick profit than the safety or welfare of their tenants.“The actions of these rogue landlords are helping fuel illegal working, benefit fraud, and illegal immigration by creating a shadow housing market that carries dangers to people’s health as well as communities.“The Government is determined to crack down on rogue landlords and these measures, alongside those in the Housing Bill, will further strengthen councils’ powers to tackle poor-quality privately rented homes in their area.”new rules Housing Minister Brandon Lewis rogue landlords crackdownn on rogue landlords The Negotiator Conference & Expo fresh proposals November 13, 2015The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles 40% of tenants planning a move now that Covid has eased says Nationwide3rd May 2021 Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 Home » News » New measures to clamp down on rogue landlords previous nextRegulation & LawNew measures to clamp down on rogue landlordsHousing Minister Brandon Lewis has vowed to ‘crack down’ on ‘rogue landlords’.The Negotiator13th November 20150651 Viewslast_img read more

State Sen. Nicholas Sacco introduces anti-red light camera enforcement legislation

first_img× NORTH BERGEN – State Senator and North Bergen Mayor Nicholas Sacco has joined with two other state senators to introduce legislation that would bar the state’s motor vehicle commission from giving identifying information on New Jersey drivers to camera enforcement entities from other states.The Camera Enforcement Inoculation Act would, consequentially, protect state drivers from receiving tickets for automated enforcement infractions, the senators said.Sacco likened controversial red light camera enforcement to a cash grabbing scheme at taxpayers’ expense.“These camera enforcement schemes have been proven to be about money, not safety,” Sacco said.“You go on a trip through Pennsylvania, Maryland, D.C. or New York City and you receive multiple tickets in the mail a month or more later and you have no way to defend yourself. It’s infuriating. New Jersey does not prey upon our drivers with the use of cameras. Other states are able to prosecute us through the cooperation of our MVC with their cameras. This bill will protect our motorists from this predatory practice.”Red light cameras have received criticism in some areas, as motorists have received tickets even when the light was yellow. A 2014 study from the Chicago Tribune found no safety benefit from cameras installed at intersections with few crashes or injuries, and claimed the cameras actually increased accidents.last_img read more

Trey Anastasio Band Makes Its Debut At The Fillmore In Philly To Start Second Leg Of Tour

first_imgTrey Anastasio Band geared back up for the second leg of their tour last night following a two-week break after their performance at The Danforth Music Hall in Toronto, Canada, on May 7th. To kick off this latest tour leg, the eight-piece band made their debut at The Fillmore in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania before the group continues on to DelFest, Summer Camp, and Red Rocks Amphitheatre in the coming week.During last night’s performance, Trey Anastasio Band opened their show up with “Sand,” harkening back to their tour opener at The Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, New York, in mid-April. Across the first set, the band worked through regular numbers from the TAB catalog including “Mozambique” (which heavily featured Natalie Cressman), “Cayman Review,” “Valentine,” “Tuesday,” “Pigtail,” and “Curlew’s Call.” The first set also Phish’s “Magilla,” “Gotta Jibboo,” and “Ocelot” sprinkled within the set.For Trey Anastasio Band’s second set at The Fillmore, the group opened up with the classics “Drifting” and “Night Speaks To A Woman.” From there, the group moved into a cover of Leon Russell’s “Delta Lady,” marking the third time the ensemble has played the song following its debut in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on May 2nd, and its second performance a few days later in Indianapolis on May 5th. Again, pulling from their tour opener at The Capitol Theatre, the group returned to a cover of Portugal The Man’s “Feel It Still” following TAB numbers “Simple Twist Up Dave” and “The Song.” After Crosby, Stills, & Nash’s “49 Bye Byes,” and Anastasio’s “Last Tube” and “Architect,” Jennifer Hartswick led the group to close out the second set with covers of Gorillaz’s “Clint Eastwood” and Led Zeppelin’s “Black Dog.”To end the night, Trey Anastasio Band put on a three-song encore for the Philadelphia crowd. Trey and the horn section—composed of Cressman, Hartswick, and saxophonist James Casey—sang an a capella rendition of “The Parting Glass” before the rest of the gang joined in for “Heavy Things” and “Push On Til The Day” to close out the night for good. You can check out the setlist below as well as some videos from Trey Anastasio Band’s debut at The Fillmore in Philadelphia last night.[Cover photo: Erik Kabik]Setlist: Trey Anastasio Band | The Fillmore | Philadelphia, PA | 5/26/2017Set One: Sand, Sometime After Sunset, Mozambique, Magilla, Gotta Jiboo, Pigtail, Curlew’s Call, Cayman Review, Ocelot, Valentine, TuesdaySet Two: Drifting, Night Speaks to a Woman, Delta Lady, Simple Twist Up Dave, The Song, Feel It Still, 49 Bye Byes, Last Tube, Architect, Clint Eastwood, Black DogEncore: The Parting Glass, Heavy Things, Push On ‘til the Day“Curlew’s Call”[Video courtesy of 215music]“Ocelot”[Video courtesy of rdeal1999]“Drifting”[Video courtesy of Brett Walford]“Delta Lady”[Video courtesy of rdeal1999]“Feel It Still”[Video courtesy of rdeal1999]“Architect”[Video courtesy of paul languedoc]“Clint Eastwood”[Video courtesy of PheelinPhine1]“Black Dog”[Video courtesy of PheelinPhine1]“The Parting Glass” and “Heavy Things”[Video courtesy of rdeal1999]last_img read more

50+ Dead, 500+ Injured In Mass Shooting At Music Festival On Las Vegas Strip

first_imgUPDATE [10/2/17 – 12:30 PM EDT]: This morning, the world awoke to the the horrifying news of a deadly mass shooting during a music festival on the Las Vegas strip that claimed the lives of more than 50 people and saw 400+ more people injured, as thousands more looked on in terror. According to reports, a lone gunman opened fire into the crowd attending the open-air country music concert, Route 91 Harvest Festival at the Las Vegas Village from a 32nd floor window of the adjacent Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino beginning during country singer Jason Aldean‘s performance. The death and injury tolls make this one of the deadliest mass shootings in United States history.The gunman has been identified as 64-year old Stephen Paddock of Mesquite, NV. Police responded to reports of the shooting just after 10 p.m. (1 a.m. ET), and the suspect was apprehended and fatally shot in the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, officials said. The sheriff also said authorities think they have found Marilou Danley, the woman believed to be traveling with the suspect.Authorities found several weapons in Paddock’s room after using explosives to enter, law enforcement officials reported. It was not immediately clear what kinds of weapons were found. At least one off-duty Las Vegas police officer was shot, Lombardo said. Several other off-duty police officers are believed to be among the dead and injured.NBC News spoke to people who were at the concert when the shooting occurred. “We heard what sounded like firecrackers going off. Then all of a sudden we heard what sounded like a machine gun. People started screaming that they were hit… When we started running out there were probably a couple hundred [people] on the ground,” Meghan Kearney described to MSNBC. “People kept dropping and dropping…People were getting shot one foot away from us,” she said. “People were trying to save their friends. There were gunshots everywhere. Helping them would’ve meant that we got shot, too.”“After the second round… everybody hit the ground around us,” concert-goer Sean said on TODAY. “It seemed like people were hit everywhere.” Aldean later said via Instagram that he and his band were safe. Witnesses said that the first round of shots sounded like fireworks. Only after the second burst of gunfire did the band stop playing. Another concergoer, Jon Bessette, described a scene of “pandemonium” as “the band ran off stage. Everyone was running, people were getting trampled,” he said.You can view a shot of the large crowds attending the festival on the highly trafficked Las Vegas Strip from the first day of Route 91 Harvest Festival below, via the festival’s Facebook page. The event organizers have yet to officially comment on the horrifying events of Sunday evening.Police have urged families looking to locate missing loved ones to call 1-866-535-5654.This story is developing. Check back for updated on last night’s horrific events in Las Vegas. Our thoughts and prayers go out to anyone and everyone affected by this senseless act of violence.center_img [Cover photo via David Becker/Getty Images/NYT][via NBC News]last_img read more

Group reviews inconsistent dorm policies

first_imgMembers of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”last_img read more