Monthly archives: January, 2021

Mammograms offered to staff, students

first_img“The mammogram, what it does is it analyzes the breasts of the women and the purpose is to detect breast cancer,” Kelly said. “They’re taking X-rays of your breast and they can detect cancer way in advance of when you might be able to feel it if you were doing a self-examination.” The unit will be located in the parking lot between the Student Center and McCandless Hall. According to Kelly, this is the second year the unit has visited campus, and the College plans to continue to offer this opportunity once per semester. Encouraging women to have their yearly mammogram performed, Saint Mary’s College will offer the Mobile Mammogram Unit from St. Joseph Regional Medical Center.The unit will be available to perform mammograms from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Thursday, Debby Kelly, director of Human Resources at the College, said.  According to Kelly, faculty and staff will only have a $15 co-pay with the College’s insurance plan. Kelly said students should inquire about pricing when making an appointment due to differences in medical insurance.  A yearly mammogram is recommended for women ages 40 and up in order to be proactive about breast cancer, Kelly said Kelly said the unit resembles a tour bus but had the necessary equipment to perform mammograms. “I think it’s important for every woman who reaches age 40 [to start] getting them annually because like with any cancer if they detect it earlier, the odds of being able to treat it and have the woman survive are much greater the earlier you catch it,” she said.center_img Women interested in obtaining a mammogram on the mobile unit should call 574-247-5400 to schedule an appointment. “It’s a unit that travels around in the local area, and they go to local businesses and they allow women to come there and get their annual mammograms,” Kelly said. “What makes it really nice is it’s really convenient for people who work here because they don’t have to leave their job and travel to the doctor’s office or the hospital to have the test. They can just walk right over to the unit.” “I think we’re going to plan to have them come twice a year, every year … That way, you know usually people are supposed to have their mammograms once a year, and that way they can just schedule and have them here,” she said. “It’s just really convenient.” Kelly said although students are invited to make an appointment if they feel the need, mainly faculty and staff will utilize the unit. “There is a cost associated with it,” Kelly said. “It’s not something the College is paying for, but it would be covered by insurance, so if a student has health insurance and they are eligible and their insurance provides for mammograms then they could certainly make an appointment.” “Women really are encouraged to have the mammograms annually,” Kelly said. “So if they’re not able to take advantage of the mobile unit here, I still encourage them to get their mammograms.”last_img read more

Group reviews inconsistent dorm policies

first_imgMembers of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”,Members of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed inconsistencies in dorm policy, particularly between male and female residence halls, at their meeting Friday. The conversation focused on differences between the men and women’s residence halls regarding weekend activities. Some students expressed they felt there is a lack of consistency in the rules enforced by rectors. Both students and faculty supported an effort to push toward a consistent alcohol policy and in-house punishments. “The baseline is Indiana state law. As far as policy, it’s in DuLac. We are not exempt from the civil law, no one is exempt,” Morrissey Manor rector Fr. Ron Vierling said. Vierling said responses from rectors sometimes appear inconsistent because other students are not aware of the full details of a specific situation. “When we talk about a pastoral approach (to these situations), we talk about the primacy of the individual,” Vierling said. “My response to an individual situation may seem inconsistent because not everyone in the dorm knows the entire story.” Members of the council also voiced complaints that men frequently receive lighter punishments than women for underage drinking. Alcohol policy in DuLac is written with the same guidelines regardless of gender, Vierling said. Vierling said the first alcohol offense can be treated in-house, but others are required to be sent to the Office of Residence Life. Annie Selak, rector of Walsh Hall, said this is the case “provided it is not severe intoxication.” Other members of the council expressed discontent with dorm rules for using side doors after parietals. In women’s dorms, usually only the front door is open after parietals, but in some men’s residence halls such as Morrissey, residents can enter through either of two doors after parietals. “Keenan [Hall] has all three doors available to access at all hours,” Keenan senator John Vernon said. “But after midnight in some girls dorms, you can only go through the main door.” Consistency in policy was also addressed regarding instituting modular furniture in dorms. “All of the contraptions you see in the different dorms are not up to code,” student body president Brett Rocheleau said. “It’s mainly dealing with fire safety and the safety of our students.” Rocheleau said all dorms will likely switch over to modular furniture within the next five years. The council lastly discussed hall taxes and how they vary from dorm to dorm. “The hall receives no money from the University, so the only operating budget of residence halls are hall tax and concession stand,” Selak said. Students often wonder where this money goes, Vierling said. “Our hall tax is set by the Manor, by the council,” he said. “We publish a financial statement to the dorm every month. It’s your money. You should know how it’s spent.”last_img read more

Minute by minute, fighting until the end

first_imgBOSTON – After a long day of travel, including more than four hours of flight delays, we finally checked into the Revere Hotel just before 7 p.m. We quickly changed and headed off to the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center (BCEC), the central hub of Election Night 2012 for the Romney/Ryan campaign. We are based in the Press Filing Center, which is playing host to hundreds of reporters from around the world as they cover the GOP side of the presidential race. Here is a minute-by-minute account of the night’s events. 7:08 p.m.: We are dropped off by our cab at the BCEC and make our way to the security check-in. The building is lit up with red, white and blue, and loads of Republicans, young and old alike, are being bused to the center. 7:36 p.m.: After some major help from our media contact, we head through security and make it into the Press Filing Center, which is only about half full. Fox News and CNN are playing on two large screens in the front of the room, flanking a stage. The first few rows are for the traveling press – The New York Times, Newsweek and The Los Angeles Times, to name a few. There is even a spot for Canal+, a French network. The major broadcast and cable networks – Fox News, ABC News, NBC News and so forth all have their own rooms. 7:44 p.m.: We receive word in the Press Filing Center that Romney’s plane has landed in Boston, and hopefully is on his way to the BCEC. 7:48 p.m.: In news back home, Notre Dame alumnus Joe Donnelly is deadlocked at 47 percent with Republican competitor Richard Mourdock in the race for Indiana Senator. Donnelly, who also graduated from the Notre Dame Law School, leads Mourdock by just over a thousand votes. 7:51 p.m.: 41,557 tweets per minute are sent with the hashtag “#election2012,” according to Fox News. That is some serious thumb exercising out there. 8:05 p.m.: We eat some food. Polenta, pork, garlic chicken and artichoke – It’s pretty good, except they ran out of dessert. 8:09 p.m.: We are reminded that while it is America who is choosing its president tonight, the entire world is watching the election. We have run across members of the press with accents that run the gamut from French to German, British to Indian. 8:15 p.m.: It is interesting to see the rate the different networks are reporting the results of states’ electoral votes. Fox News is way ahead, counting 78 for Obama and 82 for Romney while CNN is at a more conservative 64 for the President and 56 for the former Massachusetts governor. 8:20 pm.: And Domer Joe Donnelly is ahead by almost 40,000 votes according to CNN. If elected, he would be the first Irish alum in the Senate in modern history. 8:27 p.m.: CNN just showed a shot of huge crowds outside in Chicago supporting Obama. We saw no such thing on our way into the BCEC – Boston may be Romney headquarters, but Massachusetts is a solidly “blue” state. 8:51 p.m.: CNN was just cut out for a moment for Fox News. We almost lost Anderson Cooper for a moment, but thankfully he is back on the big screen. 9:00 p.m.: 14 states with 156 electoral votes just closed their polls. Also just in – Michigan, Romney’s home state where his father was once governor, will send its 16 electoral votes to Obama 9:05 p.m.: Gov. Bob McDonnell of Virginia, a Notre Dame alumnus, phones in to the BCEC on a video screen and offers thanks to the Republican volunteers who have gathered in Boston. He said he looks forward to calling the Republican candidate “President Romney” come tomorrow morning. 9:07 p.m.: CNN declares GOP will maintain lead in the House of Representatives and the foyer at the BCEC erupts with applause. 9:31 p.m.: Are we headed for Armageddon? Fox News has the two candidates in a tie; Romney and Obama are locked at 153 electoral votes. 9:39 p.m.: Romney senior strategist Ed Gillespie takes the stage at BCEC and said he is “optimistic and confident” about the ballots rolling in around the country. 9:40 p.m.: Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio comes in via videoconference, saying this is the campaign he has most enjoyed being a part of. He said the Republican campaign “channeled energy and enthusiasm of Mitt and Paul” in his home state. 10:03 p.m.: More states polls just closed, including several swing states. All of a sudden, the Fox News anchors are going crazy with the video screen and potential outcomes of states swinging either “red” or “blue.” Technology at its finest. 10:15 p.m.: A Spanish-language network just was reporting next to our desk in the Press Filing Center. The back half of the room is pretty full, but as you get to the front of the room with larger media outlets, it is largely empty. Only a few members of the Romney traveling press are here. 10:30 p.m.: According to Twitter, the 2012 election has already become the most tweeted-about U.S. political event in history. No surprises there. In other news, Romney is ahead of Obama by nearly 1.5 million votes in the popular votes – but is in the fight of his life for electoral votes. 10:40 p.m.: And we have switched to local news at the Press Filing Center, as incumbent Republican Sen. Scott Brown of Massachusetts has lost to Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren. Brown is giving a concession speech, and is gracious in defeat. 11:01 p.m.: With many West Coast states’ polls closing, Fox News has Obama leading Romney in Electoral College votes, 244 to 193. He needs just 26 more to clinch the presidency. Several swing states’ ballots – including Ohio, Florida and Nevada – are still being counted. 11:10 p.m.: CNN projects Obama will win Iowa. From the shots of Chicago, it looks like the crowd is going wild. 11:12 p.m.: Fox News has Obama within eight electoral votes of the presidency. The network projects him winning the crucial battleground state of Ohio. 11:14 p.m.: NBC has declared Obama the winner of the 2012 presidential election. Phones are starting to ring at the BCEC Press Filing Center, and for the first time of the night, there is a palpable buzz in the room. 11:18 p.m.: Fox News and CNN have called it too. Time to get to work in the Press Filing Center – keys are being pattered at, all sorts of foreign language chattering is flying back and forth and phones are ringing off the hook. 11:25 p.m.: Now Fox News is claiming they may have projected an Obama win in Ohio win too early, as the candidates are neck-and-neck with 72 percent of ballots reported. According to one Fox News correspondent, Romney’s staff in Boston is “frantically crunching numbers” and is not prepared to make a concession speech. 11:44 p.m.: According to an aide, Romney is not ready to concede. Supporters are sticking around the BCEC ballroom. It looks like we may be in for a long night. Of note is that Romney still has a comfortable lead in the popular vote. 11:59 p.m.: Candy Crowley of CNN says the BCEC contingent is a “quiet crowd” and says Romney is still not ready to concede. 12:07 a.m.: Although the network says there is no word on a concession call from Romney to Obama Fox News is talking about the Republican candidate’s post-campaign life. Crowd shots of BCEC ballroom are somber. It looks like the beginning of the end. 12:28 a.m.: “What’s [Romney] doing really, sobbing uncontrollably?” says the Canadian reporter behind me. The press is antsy for some sort of indication as to when Romney plans to come out concede the race. 12:32 a.m.: Still waiting on any word as to when Romney plans on addressing the crowds here at the BCEC. 12:35 a.m.: Obama is finally ahead in the popular vote, according to CNN. 12:50 a.m.: We hear Mitt Romney is to speak at 12:55 a.m. EST. 12:55 p.m.: Romney takes the stage at the BCEC ballroom to raucous applause, announces he has called President Obama and conceded the race. “I pray that our president will be successful in guiding our nation,” he said to the audience. 1 a.m.: Romney wraps up his concession speech. “We have given our all to this campaign. I so wish, I so wish, that I had been able to fulfill your votes to lead the country in a different direction,” he said. “But the nation chose another leader, and so Ann and I join with you to urgely pray for him and for this great nation.” 1:37 a.m.: Obama takes the stage in Chicago with Michelle, Malia and Sasha in tow to deliver his victory speech. 1:59 a.m.: Obama has wrapped up his victory speech. After nearly seven hours at the BCEC, we’re ready to wrap this puppy up. Romney lost and Obama won, but it was an incredible experience to be in Boston covering the event.last_img read more

Notre Dame CIO earns award

first_imgNotre Dame Vice President and Chief Investment Officer (CIO) Scott Malpass was recently selected to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award from CIO Magazine.Malpass will receive the award at the magazine’s Industry Innovation Awards on Dec. 8 at the New York Public Library in New York City.Malpass, who was notified of his selection for the award earlier this month, said the award reflects positively on the work of his staff and the University as a whole.“I’m thrilled for Notre Dame and what [the Lifetime Achievement Award] means for the University,” Malpass said. “This is a kind of recognition you don’t get without a team and support.”Malpass is “an investor [who] grew alongside [Notre Dame’s] endowment, both becoming among the most respected in the institutional universe,” according to a CIO Magazine press release.A 1984 graduate of Notre Dame, Malpass was named CIO of the University in 1989, at the age of 26. He oversees an endowment that has grown from $453 million when he started to approximately $8.3 billion at the end of the 2013 fiscal year, making it the 12th-largest endowment in American education and the highest at an American Catholic university.Sara Shoemake | The Observer Malpass said the commonalities shared by his staff, which is largely made up of Notre Dame graduates, help drive the investment office’s actions.“We have a real sense of purpose and a Catholic mission,” he said. “We’re a long-term investor, not worried about next week or next quarter or next year. We’re looking for the best-of-breed, the top investment talent to manage money for us.”In an interview last year with Institutional Investor Magazine, Malpass said he and his staff had developed “the Notre Dame model,” a strategy distinct from those at Harvard and Yale, which hold the first- and second-largest endowments, respectively, among American universities.Malpass said this model involves not only a shared mission but also a focus on building quality relationships with outside investors.“[The Notre Dame model] relates to something I’ve talked about, acting from a shared sense of mission and purpose and nurturing a high-caliber, committed team,” Malpass said. “It also involves identifying and building relationships with the best investors in the world.“While working together, we want to help them be successful and help us be successful. It’s better to have a good relationship and not be antagonistic to each other. We want investors to extend themselves, talk to our students, offer internships — do things deeper and different than what others do.”Part of Malpass’s recent investment strategy involves outreach to international investors. Malpass, who spent part of the last academic year in London, said he will return to England later this fall and currently has staff members working in China.“The team is always meeting with partners overseas and continues to deepen networks throughout the world,” he said. “We will continue to go out and meet partners and deepen relationships internationally with more long-term assignments overseas.”Malpass is active on Notre Dame’s campus, as he also serves as an assistant professor of finance in the Mendoza College of Business. In keeping with his investing philosophy, Malpass said he and his team are more focused on the bigger picture than on a particular goal for this semester.“We’ll focus on nitpicky operational things, but we want to maintain a disciplined process for how we go about sourcing and meeting and building relationships,” Malpass said. “… There’s a tendency to be short-term oriented, but we try to resist those short-term pressures and try to act like a long-term fundamental investor through cycles and dislocations and other things.”Malpass said he expects to have a “small representative group,” including some of his senior staff members, on hand for the award dinner later this year.“I do want to emphasize my team because I can’t do this without them,” he said. “Most of them have a lot of longevity too, and they’re great Notre Dame people.”Tags: CIO, CIO Magazine, Industry Innovation Awards, Lifetime Achievement Award, Notre Dame vice president, Scott Malpasslast_img read more

Corporate executive emphasizes ethics in business

first_imgTom Tropp, vice president of corporate ethics and sustainability for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., visited Notre Dame on Tuesday to discuss corporate ethics. The lecture was part of the Berges Lecture Series in Business Ethics, held each fall by Notre Dame’s Center for Ethics and Religious Values in Business and the Institute for Ethical Business Worldwide. In this series, senior executives speak about their personal experiences involving ethics from a corporate point of view.In 2007, Tropp earned a Masters in philosophical and theological ethics at the University of Chicago Divinity School. That same year, his international insurance brokerage company was bought out by Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., landing Tropp the opportunity to start his career rooted in ethics at Gallagher.“I went back to school to study theology,” Tropp said. “I went to learn more about my faith and within a semester, I fell in love with ethics. It was a personal conviction. Crazy, I was 55 years old when I went back to school.”Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. is the third largest insurance brokerage firm in the world and participates in 30 to 35 mergers every year. Tropp said Gallagher focuses not only on the stockbroker, but also on the stakeholder and the ethics involved in the process.“About 15 years ago … people began in the business world to equate compliance and ethics,” Tropp said. “If it’s legal, it’s ethical.“That’s not true,” he said. “There is a difference between compliance and ethics, and it is important that we understand that in the corporate world.”Tropp also addressed the misconception that ethics and compliance are synonymous. He said the two are in fact very different because compliance tells people what they must do, whereas ethics states what people should do.“Compliance is about the minimum. … Ethics is the stuff that raises us above the minimum and makes us think different from other companies,” Tropp said. “… Every company you deal with has the same compliance. Ethics is unique. Ethics is different at every company because ethics follows the people.”Tropp said that a “high integrity” company is composed of four points: corporate ethics, environmental integrity, community involvement and employee health and welfare. He said that Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. has a document called “The Gallagher Way” that helps uphold these four elements.“The Gallagher Way was made in May of 1984,” Tropp said. “… We will not change it. It is the most important document in our company. Every major decision we make on the 25th floor, that document is lying on the table.”Tropp said he believes there are certain values every human being deserves. He said these values are non-exclusionary but universal.“Different cultures have different standards of compliance, but values transcend borders,” Tropp said.Tropp ended his lecture with some advice for students about to enter the job market.“Avoid paranoia. Avoid fear. Pick a company that you respect,” Tropp said. “Lots of people take a job because they think they’re not going to have another opportunity. Don’t do it. Get a job with a company you respect.”Tags: ethics, Mendoza, mendoza college of businesslast_img read more

ESPN to appeal NDSP decision

first_imgESPN filed a notice in the Indiana Court of Appeals on Monday, announcing its intention to appeal an April 20 ruling in St. Joseph Superior Court that Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) records are not public, according to a report in the South Bend Tribune.The notice was filed on the final day of a 30-day appeal period, but ESPN has not yet filed its official legal argument, according to the Tribune.ESPN and its reporter, Paula Lavigne, initially filed a lawsuit in St. Joseph Superior Court on Jan. 15, after Lavigne’s formal requests for NDSP records for several incidents involving student athletes were denied last September and November. Following each of these denials, Lavigne submitted complaints to Indiana Public Access Counselor (PAC) Luke Britt, whose non-binding decisions broke from those of previous PACs and ruled NDSP should be subject to the state’s public records laws.On April 20, St. Joseph Superior Court Judge Steven Hostetler ruled in favor of the University, determining that NDSP records are not subject to the Indiana Access to Public Records Act (APRA). In his decision Hostetler wrote that NDSP is not subjected to the APRA as the law is currently written, but that he shares Britt’s “discomfort” with NDSP’s refusal to release records.Tags: ESPN, lawsuit, NDSPlast_img read more

Justice Friday explores legacy of MLK

first_imgIn the latest installment of the Justice Education Friday series, Samira Payne, assistant director of the Office of Civic and Social Engagement, and Gloria Jenkins, director of Multicultural Services, discussed the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 2016, specifically with a focus on inclusivity and diversity on Saint Mary’s campus and the greater community. “The Civil Rights Act of 1964 is one of the biggest achievements of the Civil Rights movement,” Jenkins said. “It was first proposed by President John F. Kennedy, and it definitely survived great opposition. It was after his death that it was signed by Lyndon B. Johnson.”The Civil Rights Act focused on ending the legality of discrimination, Jenkins said.“Under the Civil Rights Act, segregation on the grounds of race, religion or national origins is banned at all places of public accommodation, including court houses, parks, restaurants, sports arenas, theaters and hotels,” Jenkins said. “No longer could blacks and other minorities be denied service based on the color of their skin.”Junior member of the Justice Education student advisory committee Caylin McCallick said that while to some extent, King’s goals were met, modern times see a different form of discrimination that is not necessarily apparent at first. “I used to think things were getting better,” McCallick said. “Then I went on a tour of the Underground Railroad museum, and they talked about current slavery. … The majority of people in prison are actually black people, and it’s just a different kind of slavery that we’ve changed into.”Payne said one way to break down stereotypes and help fight against discrimination is to build relationships with people from all racial and ethnic backgrounds. She said it can be as simple as striking up a conversation in the elevator or attending an event put on by one of the many multicultural groups on campus.“The value of relationships in terms of breaking down stereotypes and being able to gain a better understanding of different cultures and people from different backgrounds is huge,” Payne said. “Not just on our campus, but in our community as well. We talked about Saint Mary’s being a bubble. It’s really hard to get outside of that bubble and a lot of people from our community have these stereotypes of what South Bend means.“Often times, it’s a relationship that we create with someone in our community that helps change our perspective of how something is; it helps us to just open our eyes a little bit more,” she said. “Whether it be on campus or off campus, I encourage you all to work to build relationships with people, because I think relationships are a primary component of how we create change.”Jenkins said she believes students such as the ones who attended the presentation will help create the change that King dreamed of. “It is something that, even as myself, we’re put in situations when you know you’re uncomfortable, you know it’s not right,” Jenkins said. “So what is our role when we find ourselves in that place? It’s to make our voices heard. … We’re doing what MLK wants us to do. It’s going out there and making change. You might not think it’s big, but you never know how you might have touched that person that you said ‘Hi’ to or welcomed onto Saint Mary’s campus.”last_img read more

Fire causes evacuation of North Dining Hall

first_imgA small electrical fire caused a complete evacuation of North Dining Hall just before 8 p.m. Thursday night. After all students and staff left the building, the fire was contained in the electrical room in the basement, according to the Notre Dame Security Police. Emergency vehicles from several fire departments responded to the alarm. “As a result of that alarm, it’s standard procedure for Notre Dame to respond, along with Clay [County] and South Bend Fire Departments, along with the Notre Dame Police Department. So that’s why you see this large response,” Paul Browne, vice president for public affairs and communications, said in an interview with WNDU. NDSP confirmed the fire was extinguished by 10 p.m., and the entire building is currently undergoing safety checks. As a precaution, the power was turned off in North Dining Hall. Additionally, the fire department at the scene blocked off parts of the surrounding area, around Farley Hall, Geddes Hall and Mod Quad. Crews at North Dining Hall are working to restore power to the building.North Dining Hall will be closed all day Friday, according to an email sent to students that morning.Tags: fire, NDSP, North Dining Halllast_img read more

SMC celebrates Martin Luther King Jr.’s life, work with dinner

first_imgSaint Mary’s Student Diversity Board and the Division of Mission hosted a dinner in celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and work ThursdayThe dinner featured guest speaker Darryl Heller, director of the Civil Rights Heritage Center at Indiana University-South Bend.“[King’s] dream was one of racial harmony,” Heller said. Heller discussed not only the most famous actions of Martin Luther King Jr., but also the lesser-known aspects of his work.“The King that we’re almost never told about is the Martin Luther King whose conscience required him to break his silence over the Vietnam war, even knowing it would cost him the support of the Johnson administration and many others,” Heller said.Martin Luther King Jr. tends to be remembered more for his “I Have A Dream” speech and other early work, rather than for the speeches he gave towards the end of his life, Heller said. “We are almost never made aware of the King who asked ‘Where do we go from here?’ in a speech he gave at the 11th annual SCLC convention in Atlanta in 1967,” Heller said. “Here, King passionately spoke about the thread that connected the history of slavery with the oppression black people continue to experience. He called on black people to organize for economic and political power because he reminded listeners that the plantation and the ghetto were created by those who had power.”In addition, Heller touched on the importance of taking into account the fact that African Americans have been enslaved for 246 years, and free for just 152 years.“Today we still have been enslaved for 94 years more than we have been free,” Heller said. “The balance of black freedom to black slavery will not balance out until the next century.”The attempts to reach this balance are continually met with backlash, Heller said.“However, every step towards America’s promise has been met with a backlash meant to … expand white supremacy and patriarchy,” Heller said.Over time, these backlashes can be seen expressed in different ways: Some include the Jim Crowe laws, lynching and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Heller said.In recent times, “a burst of hope” was seen in the election of the nation’s first black president, Barack Obama, Heller said.“This was met with increased voter suppression laws, a parade of unarmed black people killed by those who were supposed to serve and protect them, the rise of the school choice movement to support black education, and the thinly veiled rhetoric that appeals to those that want to hold on to white-skinned privilege,” Heller.However, this resulted what Heller described as the “ultimate backlash”: the election of President-elect Donald Trump.“Today, we are facing a new administration that looks backwards and draws upon some of the worst that America has to offer,” Heller said.However, Heller also spoke of the fact that Martin Luther King Jr. inspired — and continues to inspire — an array of social movements in both our nation and abroad, and that in honoring Martin Luther King Jr., we should “honor the whole man.”“The Civil Rights movement, which was led by black people, created a space and gave energy to multiple social movements in the 1960s,” Heller said. “This is because of [Martin Luther King Jr.’s] dream. Our dream. … Calling us to work towards a future that embodies not just the letter but also the spirit of the best parts of the nation’s founding documents.”Tags: Darryl Heller, Donald Trump, Martin Luther King Jr.last_img read more

Judicial Council announces two tickets for student body president, vice president

first_imgThe Judicial Council announced two tickets for the upcoming elections for the offices of student body president and vice president.Juniors Becca Blais and Sibonay Shewit along with juniors Rohit Fonseca and Daniela Narimatsu Felippe both received the requisite 700 signatures to be eligible for the electoral process.A debate is scheduled for Feb. 6, and the candidates have also been invited to a forum with the student group We Stand For on Feb. 2. The election will take place Feb. 8.If neither ticket receives a majority of the vote, a run-off will take place between the two. Should that be the case, a second debate is set for Feb. 12, and the final election will take place Feb. 14., according to the Judicial Council’s website. The winning ticket will take office for the 2017-2018 term April 1, succeeding current student body president Corey Robinson and Blais, who is also the current student body vice president.The Blais-Shewit ticket emphasizes “innovation, transparency and consistent outreach” according to official campaign materials. Blais and Shewit include offering better follow-up resources and support for victims of sexual assault, hiring a Diversity and Inclusion officer to oversee student training and pushing the University to offer free STD testing in St. Liam’s.The Fonesca-Narimatsu campaign is focused on “serving the community and guiding with a purpose,” according to their platform.Fonesca and Narimatsu include moderated roundtable debates amongst groups of students, publishing a quarterly report on reported sexual assaults, Monday morning prayers with the student body president and broadening the Grab and Go options.Tags: elections, president, Student government, Vice Presidentlast_img read more